Summer

•11/07/2014 • Leave a Comment

On an Autumn beach,
When it’s cold, and the sands are empty
Rocky shores, and not a person in sight
When it’s all mine.
This is my summer.

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The Unexpected Businessman

•29/04/2011 • 1 Comment

Miroslav Kormoš captured a rare moment where “The businessman” is engrossed in a single moment while the world around him, in atypical fashion, is full of buzz from a younger generation on the go, rushing through their day leaving an ironic and unexpected scene. I love it.

Origional Image:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/miroslavkormos/5123529245/lightbox/

First seen on:

http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2011/04/12-inspirational-examples-of-street-photography-shot-with-film/#comment-10147

Note: In Reviewing this I think I am allowed to replicate the image here… if this is inaccurate let me know and I will remove the image.

A Rebuttal

•11/03/2011 • Leave a Comment

Because, sometimes there are people who make comparisons that completely avoid the context, facts and fail to use an ounce of reasoning that it scews the perspective so much, I have to make a rebuttal.

http://bcblue.wordpress.com/2011/03/11/iggy-wants-to-talk-about-fraud/

Update:

I was genuinely interested in why BC Blue thought that the Liberals were being less than fare in their criticisms of the Conservatives handling of this.  *sigh*

A Gift, an Accident and the Fair

•06/01/2011 • 3 Comments

This is old news for me, but it will likely be new news to you.

In the fall I took a trip to Greenwood, BC to visit my father and also to go to the annual fall fair in Rock Creek with my sister. She drove.

Now, I hadn’t seen my father in some time, well… that’s not true. I’ve seen him when he has headed into Vancouver for his fairly regular dental appointments. Yes, his dentist is a 482km drive from where he lives.

My father's 482km drive to see his dentist

The point being, I hadn’t visited his home in over a year.

To make up for this I thought it would be nice to give him a gift. One made by hand, something to show him that I am willing to put in an effort. This is important to me given that I haven’t put in much of an effort to visit over the years. A few days before hitting the road with my sister I had decided to give stone carving a go. At the time it had nothing to do with making a gift for him and I hadn’t put any thought into it.

What I ended up making was a small figure of an elephant. I got the idea from one made of wood that I have been keeping on the dashboard of my car. When I first thought of giving him a gift I didn’t have a very hard time figuring out that this was the gift for him and I would need to put in some time to get it done before leaving.

Having no instruction or knowledge about what to do, I set out to make this elephant and in the end it actually turned out half decent. I was surprised.

My first carving: I think this is the perfect gift for him. The elephant is a symbol of strength, slowly but powerfully using it's legs to move forward and victoriously or perhaps joyfully raising it's trunk. I thought this would be great for my father as he has MS and walking is extremely trying, yet he pushes on and keeps his spirits up all the while.

He loved it. Shortly afterward I sat at him kitchen table to work on a small gnome (which, by the way, is still unfinished). While using a chisel to make the basic shape I took note of how distracting it was that my sister and father kept talking without taking any breaks. I can’t blame them though, we don’t live close and as such it is understandable to have a lot that you would like to share. At one point I was brought into this conversation… while I was still carving. This is when I learnt an important lesson. Don’t get distracted whilst using an extremely sharp object. I cut my hand as I turned in response. I dropped the chisel, pulled off my mask for filtering the dust of the stone and saw, to my surprise, that my finger nail and the top half of my left middle finger were hanging, the nail facing the same direction as my palm. I quickly flipped it back atop the bottom half of my finger and went to stop the bleeding.

It took 45 minutes to drive to the hospital in Grand Forks. The bleeding stopped around 20 minutes after this whole thing started, most of it after the first 10. The ride was the worst part though. In order to stop the bleeding I put pressure on the wound, holding the top half of my fingertip to the bottom half. Each bump in the road caused the pressure to change, and pain to rush throughout my hand and arm. The fingertip has a lot of nerve endings and when part of it is severed, down to the bone, it hurts!

I needed only 3 stitches to hold it together. The chisel entered from what would be the lower left of the image, it exited on the upper right and gouged half-way to the other side.

Fully zoomed, my finger looks disgusting / the photo looks great!

Sewn back together I returned to Greenwood. At this point it had been hours and I was getting hungry so I decided, that despite the disfigured hand I would make some bread to go with dinner.

YUM!

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The next day my sister and I went to the fair that I mentioned earlier on. So, without further ado, the fair!

Look at all those squashes. They're HUGE!

Here they had Mohair knitted goods, from animal, to spinning, to knitting, to final products you can buy.

I was surprised to find that almost every prize in every category for cooking/baking/preserving went to a family friend.

In the 90’s

•20/08/2010 • 1 Comment

Here on a CBC news article, someone posted the following:

“Last time I checked, we’d all be in very rough shape without “big business”. Remember the ’90’s?”

Well I do remember the 90’s.

In the 90’s we weren’t bombarded with product placement or brand advertising at every turn. In the 90’s Canada was still a nation of peace keepers. In the 90’s we didn’t live in the shadow of terror. In the 90’s the cold war ended. In the 90’s the BC public still owned the utilities and the rail lines. In the 90’s we didn’t have the lowest corporate taxes in the g8. In the 90’s we worked to heal the hole in the Ozone. In the 90’s our hospitals had enough beds for their patients. In the 90’s our children had reasonable class sizes and special needs students received the assistance they needed with properly funded programs. In the 90’s our arts and culture were adequately funded. In the 90’s tuition rates were still frozen. In the 90’s 13 year old children couldn’t be exploited for $6 an hour, the youngest of any developed nation. In the 90’s reality television hadn’t yet replaced educational programming.

The 90’s were great!

America is withdrawing it’s combat troops?

•19/08/2010 • Leave a Comment

The United States of America has just become to withdraw it’s combat troops.
By the end of the month they will have no more combat troops and the combat mission will be declared over.

That means no more American’s fighting in Iraq, right? Wrong!

The United States of America will leave 50,000 soldiers to train and advise the Iraqi army. They will be armed and (not so surprisingly) defend themselves if attacked and (actually surprising) accompany the Iraqi army during assaults and partake in special ops combat missions at the request of the Iraqi army.

So how is it that leaving 50,000 soldiers to continue fighting under the command of the Iraqi forces ending the American combat mission?

Migration into Canada

•16/08/2010 • 4 Comments

Many people are now aware of the Migrant ship which recently landed in B.C.. The opinions of which have been primarily negative, at least in the press.

What many forget is that immigration into Canada has been largely based on fleeing persecution. We have Irish who wanted to practice their religion, we have eastern Europeans who left due to persecution for being Slavic or their religious beliefs not lining up with state beliefs. Of course we have those of African decent who fled the United States. We also have many from Hong Kong who fled before China took over administration of the City. There are many, many more examples.

Forgetting this, we should keep in mind that a number of the Tamil migrants do have passports. We should also remember that plane is not the only mode of transportation in existanse. Remember when it was once common place for boatloads of immagrants to land? It’s how the British, Irish, Scottish, French, Polish, German, Italians, Indians, Chinese…. wait…. it’s how almost EVERYONE got here.

So to problem with this latest occurrence is…?